NASA

NASA eyes intensifying tropical cyclone 'Frances'

NASA eyes intensifying tropical cyclone 'Frances'

Two NASA satellites have provided forecasters in Australia with visible and rainfall data as tropical cyclone 'Frances' strengthened in the western Timor Sea.

NASA's Aqua satellite has captured a visible image of the storm that showed a cloud-filled eye, while the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite found heaving rainfall occurring.

Frances formed north of Melville Island, Australia on April 27, 2017.

Frances has been gradually intensifying while moving south-southwestward through the Timor Sea.

NASA's Van Allen Probes uncovers 'relativistic' electrons

NASA's Van Allen Probes uncovers 'relativistic' electrons

Earth's radiation belts, two doughnut-shaped regions of charged particles encircling our planet,were discovered more than 50 years ago, but their behaviour is still not completely understood.

Now, new observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes mission show that the fastest, most energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt are not present as much of the time as previously thought.

The results show that there typically isn't as much radiation in the inner belt as previously assumed, which is good news for spacecraft flying in the region.

NASA spacecraft's close call with Martian moon Phobos

NASA spacecraft's close call with Martian moon Phobos

NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN), which is in its second year of studying the Red Planet's atmosphere, was recently forced to perform unscheduled maneuver to avert a space-wreck.

In its first collision avoidance maneuver, MAVEN spacecraft carried out a rocket motor burn that boosted its velocity by 0.4 meters per second (less than 1 mile per hour) to steer clear of Mars' moon Phobos, NASA reported.

The correction was small, but it was enough for the spacecraft to avoid the crater-filled moon by about 2.5 minutes.

NASA needs your help in finding new ninth planet

NASA needs your help in finding new ninth planet

New York [USA], Feb. 17 : NASA has called on the world to help it in the search for the new ninth planet, as anyone from a kindergartener to a 95-year-old, can participate in their new project to find the not-yet-discovered celestial body.

To let anyone participate in this search project of ninth planet, the Zooniverse space projects site has launched a NASA-funded venture, Backyard Worlds: Planet 9, reports CNN.

"There are really low barriers to entry," Dr. Laura Trouille of Zooniverse.

NASA finds rainfall data on Tropical Cyclone Vardah

NASA finds rainfall data on Tropical Cyclone Vardah

NASA gathered rainfall data on Tropical Cyclone Vardah from its birth in the Bay of Bengal through its movement west into the Arabian Sea.

Rainfall totals were estimated over Vardah's lifetime and path, and NASA found heavy rainfall from the remnants on Dec. 14.

Although Vardah's circulation dissipated the remnants were still producing rainfall in a few stormy areas when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew over the Arabian Sea on Dec. 13 at 9:31 p.m. EST (Dec. 14 at 0231 UTC).

NASA's Curiosity rover detects boron on surface of Mars

In a first of its kind, NASA's Curiosity rover science team detected element Boron on the surface of Mars, indicating the potential for long-term habitable groundwater in the ancient past.

The finding provides more clues about water habitability.

The findings were discussed in San Francisco during the American Geophysical Union conference

"No prior mission to Mars has found boron," said a postdoctoral researcher Patrick Gasda from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

New study challenges ‘dark energy’ theory

New study challenges ‘dark energy’ theory

A team of Oxford University researchers led by Prof. Subir Sarkar has challenged the Nobel-winning theory that suggests the universe has been expanding at an accelerating rate driven by a strange substance called dark energy.

The theory in question was first proposed in the late 1990s after an analysis of Type Ia supernovae (thermonuclear explosion of dying stars) through NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

New Horizons’ next target has a bloody hue: NASA

New Horizons’ next target has a bloody hue: NASA

The next target for the National Aeronautics & Space Administration’s New Horizons spacecraft bears a colorful resemblance to Pluto, according to a new statement by mission scientists.
After making a historic flight past Pluto in July last year, NASA’s New Horizons is heading toward 2014 MU69, a space rock in the Kuiper Belt around a billion miles beyond Pluto.

Data collected by Hubble Space Telescope indicated that 2014 MU69 should be as red as Pluto is, if not redder. This is the first hint that scientists have got about the far flung object’s surface properties.

MAVEN images show Mars’ atmosphere in unprecedented detail

MAVEN images show Mars’ atmosphere in unprecedented detail

Managers for NASA's Mars Atmosphere & Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) project have released new images, showing the Red Planet's atmosphere in unprecedented detail.

The out-of-this-world images of the Red Planet show the ultraviolet (UV) glow from the planet's atmosphere in such a detail that was previously never noticed. The new images revealed the Martian atmosphere's dynamic and previously unseen behavior.

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