NASA

Moon’s surface to turn over much earlier than previously estimated: NASA

Moon’s surface to turn over much earlier than previously estimated: NASA

A new study by NASA scientists has suggested that the surface of Moon, Earth’s only natural satellite, drastically changes after some 81,000 years because of it is pounded by scores of meteoroids every day.

A fresh analysis of data collected by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft revealed that scores of space rocks are hitting Moon’s surface daily, creating new craters and changing the appearance of the surface more frequently than previous thought.

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Approaching tropical storm prompts delay of NASA’s OA-5 mission

Approaching tropical storm prompts delay of NASA’s OA-5 mission

The launch of Cygnus supply ship carrying Antares 230 rocket has been delayed again due to Tropical Storm Nicole, which is poised to strike the location of a critical launch tracking station within next couple of days.

The newly-upgraded Antares 230 rocket, which has been equipped with powerful Russian-made RD-181 engines, was scheduled to launch from pad 0A at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at 8:51 p.m. EDT Friday, Oct. 14.

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`Snowstorm of stars` captured at heart of Milky Way

`Snowstorm of stars`Snowstorm of stars` captured at heart of Milky Way

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured a new, spectacular image of the center of our Milky Way.

Peering deep into the heart of our galaxy, Hubble revealed a rich tapestry of more than half a million stars. Except for a few blue foreground stars, the stars are part of the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster, the most massive and densest star cluster in our galaxy.

NASA lines up globe-spanning research on Earth

NASA lines up globe-spanning research on Earth

NASA is sending scientists around the world this year - from the edge of the Greenland ice sheet to the coral reefs of the South Pacific
- to delve into challenging questions about how our planet is changing and what impact humans are having on it.

While Earth science field experiments are nothing new for NASA, the next six months will be a particularly active period with eight major new campaigns taking researchers around the world on a wide range of science investigations, the US space agency said in a statement.

Countdown begins to launch mission to find life on Mars

Countdown begins to launch mission to find life on Mars

In a bid to begin a new era of Mars exploration for Europe, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) are set to send a robotic probe to Mars on Monday to find if the planet has traces of alien life.

Named "ExoMars 2016", the ESA-Roscosmos mission is set to lift off from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on a Russian Proton rocket at around 3 p. m., marking the start of a seven-month journey to the Red Planet.

New NASA technology to better measure Earth's orientation

New NASA technology to better measure Earth's orientation

The US space agency has deployed an advanced technology to precisely measure Earth's orientation and rotation - information that helps provide a foundation for navigation of all space missions and for geophysical studies of our planet.

The technology includes a new class of radio antenna and electronics that provide broadband capabilities for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI).

This technique has been used to make precise measurements of the Earth in space and time.

NASA testing new technology to help spacecraft land safely on Mars

NASA testing new technology to help spacecraft land safely on Mars

To slow down a spacecraft as it descends and lands on a distant planet on deeper space mission including Mars, NASA engineers are testing inflatable heat shield technology at the US space agency's Langley Research Centre in Hampton, Virginia.

Engineers recently put the technology to the test by packing a nine-foot diameter donut-shaped test article - also known as a torus - to simulate what would happen before a space mission.

NASA plans to launch balloon flight in New Zealand

NASA plans to launch balloon flight in New Zealand

US space agency NASA is planning to set a record for the longest ever flight for a scientific balloon to be launched in New Zealand next month.

NASA's Balloon Programme team was on the cusp of expanding the envelope in high-altitude, heavy-lift ballooning with its super pressure balloon (SPB) technology, an agency statement said on Friday.

NASA experts are in the South Island resort town of Wanaka, preparing for the fourth flight of a 532,000-cubic-metre balloon, with the goal of an ultra-long-duration flight of up to 100 days, Xinhua news agency reported.

Year-long space trip adds inches to your height

Year-long space trip adds inches to your height

If you want to grow a few more inches, well this just might be the most expensive solution to your height concerns.

Astronaut Scott Kelly, who returned on March 1 after spending 340 days on the International Space Station, is now about 2 inches taller than when he left Earth.

NASA's Jeff Williams said that gaining height was expected and is temporary, explaining that astronauts get taller in space as the spine elongates, but they return to preflight height after a short time back on Earth.

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