Ross Sea agreement believes to be biggest deal ever hit to protect marine wildlife

Ross Sea agreement believes to be biggest deal ever hit to protect marine wildlife

The recent international agreement that aims to protect marine wildlife by creating the world’s largest marine reserve in Antarctica is believed to be the biggest deal ever hit to protect the region.

Nearly two dozen nations and the European Union (EU) agreed to establish the world’s largest marine protected area in Antarctica by preventing commercial fishing and other activities in the Ross Sea, which is home to marine creatures like whales, penguins and krill, which are currently threatened by overfishing.

The proposed marine reserve will cover more than 1.55 million square kilometers, with three-quarters of it being protected by a ban on commercial fishing. In the rest of the protected zone, commercial fishing will be allowed on certain conditions.

The landmark deal was hammered after the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) met in Hobart, Australia, around a few days back.

Andrew Wright, CCAMLR’s Executive Secretary, said, “This has been an incredibly complex negotiation which has required a number of Member countries bringing their hopes and concerns to the table at six annual CCAMLR meetings as well as at intersessional workshops.”

While the establishment of the protected marine zone is now in no doubt, member countries are still in need to finalize a number of details regarding the marine protected area.

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