Mothers drinking colas increase risk of obesity in kids

Mothers drinking colas increase risk of obesity in kids

Pregnant or breastfeeding mothers should avoid taking diet high in fructose-containing sugars as it increases the risk of their kids being obese or diabetic.

This is according to a new rat study published in The Journal of Physiology.

Many cereals, sugary soft drinks and other processed foods have fructose-containing sugars, including sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).

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Most religious people 'morally uncomfortable' with reproductive techs

Most religious people 'morally uncomfortable' with reproductive techs

As new and more effective human reproductive genetic technologies (RGTs) develop, religious people are likelier to disapprove of these tools than nonreligious people, a new Rice University study found.

Evangelical Christians are the most likely of any religious group to stand in opposition, the researchers found.

Here`s how protein impacts intellectual disability

Here`s how protein impacts intellectual disability

A new study has paved the way for the potential treatments of intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

Your brain needs just the right balance between excitatory "on" signals and inhibitory "calm down" signals. Now scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have shown that a protein helps balance nerve cell communication.

Pediatric clinics support mental health needs of young people

Pediatric clinics support mental health needs of young people

Anxiety and depression might be the most common mental health problems in children and adolescents but several factors including stigma pose as obstacles in obtaining the much-needed mental health care.

A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University suggests that providing a brief behavioral therapy in the pediatric primary care setting can help more young people get the help they need.

The results have been published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

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Emotional eater? Your parents are to be blamed

Emotional eater? Your parents are to be blamed

Are you an emotional eater? Do you tend to eat when you feel sad or upset? If yes, your parents are responsible.

Emotional eating - eating when you feel sad or upset or in response to another negative mood - is not uncommon in children and adolescents, but why youth eat emotionally has been unclear.

Now a new longitudinal study from Norway has found that school-age children whose parents fed them more to soothe their negative feelings were more likely to eat emotionally later on.

They findings appear in the journal Child Development.

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Stem cells can help identify neuronal defects, suggests Study

Stem cells can help identify neuronal defects, suggests Study

According to a recent study, the researchers used stem cells derived from patients with Angelman syndrome to identify the underlying cellular defects that cause the rare neurogenetic disorder.

The study was published in journal Nature Communications.

Up until now, scientists trying to understand why the brain cells of individuals with Angelman fail to develop properly have relied primarily on mouse models that mimic the disorder.

#WorldMalariaDay: Effective steps to prevent Malaria

#WorldMalariaDay: Effective steps to prevent Malaria

The theme for World Malaria Day this year is "End Malaria for Good".

Malaria is caused due to the Plasmodium parasites which are carried by the Female - Anopheles mosquito. Out of five, two species of the parasite, P. falciparum and P. vivax, pose the greatest threat to human beings. Once the mosquito bites the person, the parasite enters the liver infecting the red blood cells.

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Artificial Intelligence may help in diagnosing Tuberoculosis

Artificial Intelligence may help in diagnosing Tuberoculosis

If you are a patient of Tuberculosis, then we might have some good news for you.

According to a recent study, researchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify Tuberculosis (TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists.

The study was published in journal Radiology.

According to the World Health Organization, TB is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. In 2016, approximately 10.4 million people fell ill from TB, resulting in 1.8 million deaths.

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