Guatemalan Man Being Held at Adelanto Detention Facility Dies of Heart Attack

Guatemalan Man Being Held at Adelanto Detention Facility Dies of Heart Attack

A Guatemalan man being held in an immigrant detention center in California died Wednesday after suffering a heart attack at Adelanto Detention Facility, as per a statement by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

ICE, law enforcement agency under the US Department of Homeland Security, announced the man, Jose Manuel Azurida-Hernandez, was taken to hospital on Saturday after a heart attack, but the 54-year-old Guatemala resident couldn’t recover and died Wednesday at an Inland Empire hospital.

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Scientists discover new species of shark with jet black skin and faint glow

Scientists discover new species of shark with jet black skin and faint glow

In a latest discovery, a new shark species with jet black skin and a faint glow has been found. It is a master of stealth. The shark has been given appropriate name ‘Ninja Lanternshark’, and lives in deep waters, from 2,742 feet to 4,734 feet, or 836 to 1443 meters, in the Pacific Ocean, off Central America coast.

The animal’s unique name has been given by Vicky Vásquez’s young cousins. Vásquez is among the team of scientists that have detailed the latest shark discovery in a study carried by the Journal of the Ocean Science Foundation.

Kangaroo mother care can reduce infant death rate: Research

Kangaroo mother care can reduce infant death rate: Research

Continuous skin-to-skin contact between mother and infant during the first few days of life has been found to improve the survival rates for infants with low birth weight. The study team found that infant death cases were down by more than 35 percent when there was more skin-to-skin contact between mother and child. The study was conducted by a team of medical researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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A First: New Caledonian crows caught on camera using hook-shaped tools

A First: New Caledonian crows caught on camera using hook-shaped tools

For the very first time New Caledonian crows have been caught on camera for what they are famous for, using hook-shaped tools. The New Caledonian crows were caught on camera while they made hooked stick tools to reach food deep in tree crevices or hidden under leaf litter.

The species of crows found on New Caledonia, a forested island in the South Pacific, are quite famous for their making and using tools. This species fashion sticks into sharp instruments and use them to ‘fish’ for wood-boring larvae present in dead wood or tree trunks.

November Witnesses 4.3% Increase in New-Home Sales

November Witnesses 4.3% Increase in New-Home Sales

According to the figures released by the US Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the sales of new single-family houses in November have increased by 4.3% to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 490,000 as compared to October. The increase is being attributed to reduced sales of homes in October, thereby indicating Americans are not interested in purchasing new homes during year end.

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YouTube Accuses T-Mobile of Degrading Quality of its Videos

-YouTube Accuses T-Mobile of Degrading Quality of its Videos

T-Mobile recently launched a new program that allows viewers to watch videos without using their data allotment. But now, this new program is drawing huge criticism. YouTube has recently accused it of degrading the quality of its videos and of other users.

Bellevue-based company’s new program, called Binge On, is even available to those customers who have data plans of at least 3 gigabytes.

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Rapid ohia death hits hundreds of thousands of ohia lehua trees on Hawaii

Rapid ohia death hits hundreds of thousands of ohia lehua trees on Hawaii

A tree that’s critical to Hawaii’s water supply, endangered native birds and Hawaiian cultural traditions such as hula, has been getting increasingly killed by a newly found fungus. Rapid ohia death named disease has hit the Big Island’s hundreds of thousands of ohia lehua trees.

It has reportedly affected 50% of the ohia trees throughout 6,000 acres of forest as of last year, but since then it’s believed to have spread more. So far, it’s been discovered mainly in Puna, but also in Kona and Kau. It hasn’t been found anywhere else worldwide.

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