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Eating sausages, bacon linked to worsening of asthma

Eating sausages, bacon linked to worsening of asthma

Beware! A high dietary intake of sausages, hot dogs, salami, bacon and ham is linked to worsening of asthma symptoms, warns a study.

The findings, published online in the journal Thorax, showed that four or more weekly servings of cured and processed meat seem to have the greatest impact on symptoms, as they are rich in nitrites, which may have a role in airway inflammation - a typical feature of asthma.

The researchers drew on data from participants in the French Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA).

Mark Zuckerberg reports on his personal 2016 challenge to build AI system for his home

Mark Zuckerberg reports on his personal 2016 challenge to build AI system for his home

In a recent blog post, Facebook cofounder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has provided some details with regard to his personal 2016 challenge to build an artificial intelligence (AI) system for running his home.

Zuckerberg said in the blog post that building an AI system for his home – a decision marked a challenge that was one of a string of New Year’s resolutions made by Zuckerberg for himself in 2016 –was a learning experience for him.

Heart attacks, strokes prevented through health checks-ups

Heart attacks, strokes prevented through health checks-ups

A study led by Queen Mary University of London has revealed that health check-up programmes may prevent heart attacks, strokes or death from these causes in its first five years.

According to researchers, the NHS Health Check program in England may have prevented an estimated 4,600 to 8,400 heart attacks, strokes or death from these causes in its first five years.

Pregnancy leads to changes in a mother's brain

For would-be-mothers! A new study has revealed that pregnancy causes long-lasting alterations in brain structure by improving the mother's ability to protect and interact with her newborn.

The study was published in journal of Nature Neuroscience.

Researchers from Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain compared the structure of the brain of women before and after their first pregnancy.

This research shows that pregnancy involves long-lasting changes -- at least for two years postpartum -- in the morphology of a woman's brain.

NSAIDs may prevent recurrence of colorectal cancer

NSAIDs may prevent recurrence of colorectal cancer

A team of researchers has determined the effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and several supplements in preventing the recurrence of colorectal cancer after polyp removal.

The findings, published in the British Medical Journal, indicated that nonaspirin NSAIDs (e.g., ibuprofen) are better than all other compared therapies for preventing recurrence of adenomatous polyps within three to five years following initial polyp removal.

World's first Chikungunya vaccine developed

World's first Chikungunya vaccine developed

US researchers have developed a vaccine for chikungunya fever made from an insect-specific virus that does not have any effect on people, making the vaccine safe and effective.

The study indicated that the vaccine quickly produces a strong immune defense and completely protects mice and nonhuman primates from disease when exposed to the chikungunya virus.

The findings were published in journal of Nature Medicine.

New creatures discovered undersea!

New creatures discovered undersea!

Six new animal species have been discovered in the undersea hot springs 2.8 kilometres deep in the southwest Indian Ocean.

Scientists at the University of Southampton discovered the unique marine life around hydrothermal vents at a place called Longqi ('Dragon's Breath'), 2000 kilometres southeast of Madagascar.

The study has been described in the journal Scientific Reports.

A research team, led by Dr Jon Copley, explored an area the size of a football stadium on the ocean floor, pinpointing the locations of more than a dozen mineral spires known as 'vent chimneys'.

New world record in effectively treating social anxiety disorders

New world record in effectively treating social anxiety disorders

A team of doctors at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have recently set a new world record in effectively treating social anxiety disorders.

"We've set a new world record in effectively treating social anxiety disorders," said researcher Hans M. Nordahl.

A team of doctors and psychologists from NTNU and the University of Manchester in England, led by Nordahl, examined the effects of structured talk therapy and medication on patients with social anxiety disorders.

This study has been published in Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics.

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