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Here`s how protein impacts intellectual disability

Here`s how protein impacts intellectual disability

A new study has paved the way for the potential treatments of intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

Your brain needs just the right balance between excitatory "on" signals and inhibitory "calm down" signals. Now scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have shown that a protein helps balance nerve cell communication.

Pediatric clinics support mental health needs of young people

Pediatric clinics support mental health needs of young people

Anxiety and depression might be the most common mental health problems in children and adolescents but several factors including stigma pose as obstacles in obtaining the much-needed mental health care.

A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University suggests that providing a brief behavioral therapy in the pediatric primary care setting can help more young people get the help they need.

The results have been published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

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Emotional eater? Your parents are to be blamed

Emotional eater? Your parents are to be blamed

Are you an emotional eater? Do you tend to eat when you feel sad or upset? If yes, your parents are responsible.

Emotional eating - eating when you feel sad or upset or in response to another negative mood - is not uncommon in children and adolescents, but why youth eat emotionally has been unclear.

Now a new longitudinal study from Norway has found that school-age children whose parents fed them more to soothe their negative feelings were more likely to eat emotionally later on.

They findings appear in the journal Child Development.

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Stem cells can help identify neuronal defects, suggests Study

Stem cells can help identify neuronal defects, suggests Study

According to a recent study, the researchers used stem cells derived from patients with Angelman syndrome to identify the underlying cellular defects that cause the rare neurogenetic disorder.

The study was published in journal Nature Communications.

Up until now, scientists trying to understand why the brain cells of individuals with Angelman fail to develop properly have relied primarily on mouse models that mimic the disorder.

Artificial Intelligence may help in diagnosing Tuberoculosis

Artificial Intelligence may help in diagnosing Tuberoculosis

If you are a patient of Tuberculosis, then we might have some good news for you.

According to a recent study, researchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify Tuberculosis (TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists.

The study was published in journal Radiology.

According to the World Health Organization, TB is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. In 2016, approximately 10.4 million people fell ill from TB, resulting in 1.8 million deaths.

Researchers relate extreme weather to global warming

Researchers relate extreme weather to global warming

In the past, scientists typically avoided linking individual weather events to climate change, citing the challenges of teasing apart human influence from the natural variability of the weather. But that is changing.

"Over the past decade, there's been an explosion of research, to the point that we are seeing results released within a few weeks of a major event," said Diffenbaugh, who is also the Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

Frozen fruits, vegetables help achieve your nutrition goals

Frozen fruits, vegetables help achieve your nutrition goals

According to a recent study, people who consume frozen fruits and vegetable have significantly higher intakes of key nutrients, such as potassium, fiber and calcium.

The study was presented at 2017 Experimental Biology meeting.

The research analysed the data of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2011-2014.

When consumers of frozen fruits and vegetables were compared to non-consumers of frozen fruits and vegetables, the results of the studies were:

Loose those extra kilos as obesity is more dangerous than diabetes

Loose those extra kilos as obesity is more dangerous than diabetes

Eat healthy and loose those extra kilos to live more, as a study finds that obesity brings in more risk than diabetes, tobacco use or high blood pressure for shortening of lifespan.

Researchers from Cleveland Clinic and New York University School of Medicine found that obesity causes 47 percent more life years lost than tobacco, which causes similar life-years lost as high blood pressure.

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Higher prostate cancer risks suggest new approach to screening

Higher prostate cancer risks suggest new approach to screening

Due to increasing deaths because of prostate cancer among men, US researchers have suggested a special screening more frequently and at an early age to avoid the development of preclinical prostate cancer - that is not symptomatic - to advanced stages.

The findings indicated that among black men, the incidence of prostate cancer is 60 percent higher than that of white men, and their mortality rate from prostate cancer is more than twice as high.

Hormone therapy can lower risk of broken bones in postmenopausal women

Hormone therapy can lower risk of broken bones in postmenopausal women

Good news! A team of US researchers has found that postmenopausal women, who are at the highest genetic risk of bone fracture, can benefit the most from hormone therapy.

The study included nearly 10,000 participants from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), a national, long-term study of more than 1,50,000 women.

They included more than 1,61,000 generally healthy postmenopausal women, aged 50 to 79.

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