Washington

Dear parents! Store prescription opioids away, out of sight of kids of all ages

Dear parents! Store prescription opioids away, out of sight of kids of all ages

Dear adults, opioids prescribed cautiously for chronic pain should be stored up, away and out of sight of kids of all ages, in a locked cabinet is best, as a study finds most of the exposures occurred among children younger than five years were 60 percent and teenagers was 30 percent.

The researchers call for changes to prescribing practices, increased education about safe storage at home.

Risk score tools can improve stroke prediction in atrial fibrillation patients

Risk score tools can improve stroke prediction in atrial fibrillation patients

A study finds that by combining two independent, scientifically-proven risk measurements, physicians can better predict a patient's irregular and often very fast heart rate risk of stroke or death.

According to researchers from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, US, these tools can help to determine the need for blood thinners in treatment.

Healthy diet, exercise can reverse the condition of diabetes

Healthy diet, exercise can reverse the condition of diabetes

Good news! Healthy diet, exercise and an intensive medical treatment for two to four months can reverse the condition of Type-2 diabetes by up to 40 percent, suggests a study.

The study appeared in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition, where an individual does not produce enough insulin - the hormone that allows cells to absorb glucose in the blood - or the pancreas isn't making insulin as efficiently as it could.

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Surgery may not offer additional benefit to tennis elbow patients

Surgery may not offer additional benefit to tennis elbow patients

Tennis elbow sufferers, if the idea of going under the knife is terrifying, then you can opt for non-operative approaches as a recent study has suggested that surgery may not offer additional benefit.

The study, a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial, explored patient responses to a common surgery aimed at repairing a damaged elbow, compared to a placebo procedure.

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Here`s why your heart keeps going out of rhythm after therapy

Here`s why your heart keeps going out of rhythm after therapy

Ablation procedures may not always fix a patient's abnormal heart rhythm completely and now, a recent study has found as to why it is so.

Researchers from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have found that certain molecules are associated with the recurrence of atrial fibrillation in some patients after therapy.

These molecules, known as circulating microRNA, have the promise of becoming screening tools to help determine which patients will benefit from various therapies, the team found.

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The clot-busting drug that outperforms aspirin

The clot-busting drug that outperforms aspirin

Turns out, the blood thinner rivaroxaban is as safe as aspirin and more effective clot-buster.

Venous thromboembolism is a chronic disease, with risks of additional blood clots over a patient's lifetime. However, many physicians and patients are deciding against long-term treatment with blood thinners because of concern about the risk of bleeding. Some are choosing aspirin instead because they consider it to be safer.

The large international study of 3,396 patients with venous thromboembolism in 31 countries shows, however, that rivaroxaban is more effective than aspirin.

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Sexual abuse may accelerate early puberty in girls: Study

Sexual abuse may accelerate early puberty in girls: Study

A study reveals that girls, who experience physical abuse early in life, may hit puberty eight to 12 months earlier than their non-abused peers, thus increasing their chances of developing depression, substance abuse and teenage pregnancy.

According to researchers, sexual abuse in particular forces the children to physically mature at a faster rate, which is linked to breast and ovarian cancers due to the increased exposure to the hormone estrogen over a longer period.

Drug, alcohol problem leads to increased suicide in veterans

Drug, alcohol problem leads to increased suicide in veterans

According to a new study, veterans who have drug or alcohol problems are more than twice as likely to die by suicide as their comrades.

The research published in the journal Addiction finds highest suicide risks are among those, who misuse prescription sedative medicines, such as tranquilizers. Women veterans who misuse opioid drugs also have an especially high risk of suicide.

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