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Sing lullabies to your newborn to feel the connection

Sing lullabies to your newborn to feel the connection

Attention new mommies, sing lullabies to your new born to feel more connected to your babies, suggests a study.

The research, published in the Journal of Music Therapy, finds that through song, the infants are provided with much-needed sensory stimulation that can focus their attention and modulate their arousal.

"One of the main goals of the research was to clarify the meaning of infant-directed singing as a human behaviour and as a means to elicit unique behavioural responses from infants," said study author Shannon de l'Etoile from the University of Miami in the US.

Just 30 mins of walk can benefit cancer patients

Just 30 mins of walk can benefit cancer patients

Cancer patients can improve their quality of life with just 30 minutes of walking, suggests a study.

The study appeared in the BMJ Open journal. The findings indicated that walking provided an improved positive attitude towards their illness and spoke of the social benefits of participating in group walks.

Researchers from the University of Surrey and King's College London explored the impact of walking on the quality of life and symptom severity in patients with advanced cancer.

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Egg-free surrogate chickens can save rare poultry breeds

Egg-free surrogate chickens can save rare poultry breeds

To boost breeding of endangered poultry breeds, Briton researchers have come up with gene-editing techniques for the rare breeds to use them as surrogates that cannot produce their own chicks.

The advance -- using gene-editing techniques -- could help to boost breeding of endangered birds, as well as improving production of commercial hens, researchers say.

The appeared in the journal Development.

Meet 'Bernardbowen'- the new minor planet

Meet 'Bernardbowen'- the new minor planet

In a major development, a team of scientists have officially named a minor planet as 'Bernardbowen' that sits in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

The minor planet was discovered on October 28, 1991, and until now has been known as (6196) 1991 UO4, but the name has been given by an Australian citizen science project 'theSkyNet', who won a competition to name the celestial body.

The planet was named by the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) in honour of their founding chairman Dr. Bernard Bowen.

NASA needs your help in finding new ninth planet

NASA needs your help in finding new ninth planet

New York [USA], Feb. 17 : NASA has called on the world to help it in the search for the new ninth planet, as anyone from a kindergartener to a 95-year-old, can participate in their new project to find the not-yet-discovered celestial body.

To let anyone participate in this search project of ninth planet, the Zooniverse space projects site has launched a NASA-funded venture, Backyard Worlds: Planet 9, reports CNN.

"There are really low barriers to entry," Dr. Laura Trouille of Zooniverse.

Beware! Depression, anxiety ups complications after surgery

Beware! Depression, anxiety ups complications after surgery

Before undergoing hip replacements, knee replacements or hernia repairs, do not let depression or anxiety take a toll on your health, as a study finds, a patients' mental health may affect their risk of experiencing wound-related complications after surgery.

The findings indicated, appeared in the British Journal of Surgery, indicated that the patients with moderate anxiety or depression also had a 1.20-times greater likelihood of being re-admitted for a wound complication and had longer durations of hospital stay on average.

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Study shows links between physical attractiveness and higher salaries

Study shows links between physical attractiveness and higher salaries

As a saying, "beauty is skin deep" sounds fair, but in the real world where money is top priority, physical attractiveness might have a lot more prominence than just inner beauty.

A study finds that healthier, more intelligent people have superior personality traits are preferred more for taking fatter pay checks home than those who are aesthetically compromised.

The study appeared in Springer's Journal of Business and Psychology.

If you thought emotions are 'inborn'.you're wrong

If you thought emotions are 'inborn'.you're wrong

We never decide first and then react in a situation, we react according to the present state of mind!

A study has found that emotions are not innately programmed in our brains, but, in fact, are cognitive states resulting from the gathering of information.

The research appeared in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The team observed, "the brain mechanisms that give rise to conscious emotional feelings are not fundamentally different from those that give rise to perceptual conscious experiences."

Help your husband quit smoking with 'persuasive' messages

Help your husband quit smoking with 'persuasive' messages

Want to help your husband quit smoking? This might come in handy.

US researchers have suggested that rather than inciting fear, anti-smoking campaigns should tap into smokers' memories and tug at their heartstrings, as persuasive messages can influence their smoking attitudes.

The study appeared in Communication Research Reports.

Advertisers often use nostalgia-evoking messages to promote consumer products, and the same emotional tactic could be just as effective in encouraging healthy behaviours, argue Ali Hussain, and Maria Lapinski from Michigan State University.

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Mitochondria size matters in keeping blood sugar level stable

Mitochondria size matters in keeping blood sugar level stable

A study finds that changes in the size of mitochondria in a small subset of brain cells, may play a crucial role in safely maintaining blood sugar levels.

The study appeared in the journal Cell Metabolism.

"Low blood sugar can be as dangerous as high blood sugar," said senior author Sabrina Diano.

"We've found that changes in the size of mitochondria -- small intracellular organelles responsible for energy production -- in certain cells in the brain, could be key to maintaining the blood sugar within a safe range," Diano added.

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