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Soon, a treatment for aggressive brain cancer in kids

Soon, a treatment for aggressive brain cancer in kids

A team of researchers has discovered a promising target to treat atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour (AT/RT), a highly aggressive and therapy resistant brain tumour that mostly occurs in infants.

Using state-of-the-art gene editing technology, the scientists from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that these tumours' growth and tendency to metastasize are regulated by a protein kinase called Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), which is increased in AT/RT.

They also have demonstrated that an experimental drug, a PLK4 inhibitor, stopped tumour growth.

26 novel genes linked to intellectual disability

26 novel genes linked to intellectual disability

A team of researchers have identified 26 new genes linked to intellectual disability.

The study at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and Queen's University has implications for the diagnosis and clinical care of those affected, and also adds to our growing knowledge of brain development and functioning.

It may eventually lead to personalised treatments for affected individuals. Interestingly, some of the genes identified are thought to be connected with autism spectrum disorders.

Sewer workers could be at Ebola risk with current guidelines

Sewer workers could be at Ebola risk with current guidelines

Turns out, the guidelines from the U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization might not go far enough to protect sewer workers from Ebola virus.

Research from Drexel University and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that the sewer workers downstream of hospitals and treatment centres could contract Ebola via inhalation.

The study takes the first steps toward understanding the risk that this untreated waste poses to the people in the water treatment process who work in close proximity to it.

Toward more effective treatment for leukemia

Toward more effective treatment for leukemia

The discovery of a protein signature that is highly predictive of leukemia could make way for new and more effective therapeutics, according to a new study.

The University of Vermont study revealed that the activation of a protein known as STAT5 causes competition among other proteins that leads to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). If a drug could be developed to prevent the initial activation of STAT5 and restore the natural balance of proteins, ALL could potentially be treated more effectively.

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Role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort: Study

Role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort: Study

While it may be done for a good cause, a recent study reveals that disability simulations often result in feelings of fear, apprehension and pity toward those with disabilities.

Professionals in the fields of education and rehabilitation psychology have long used disability simulations to try to promote understanding and improve attitudes about persons with disabilities.

Researchers discover a protein to provide protection from cancer, HIV

Researchers discover a protein to provide protection from cancer, HIV

A team of US researchers has discovered a protein that can help the vaccinations be more effective and provide protection from cancer, HIV and influenza.

Researchers from Boston University's school of medicine purified a protein - called PorB - found on the exterior of bacteria (neisseria meningidis) and used it as an accessory to provide a better vaccination response.

High-intensity interval training improves glucose metabolism of diabetics

High-intensity interval training improves glucose metabolism of diabetics

New research reveals that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) increases glucose metabolism in muscles as well as insulin sensitivity in type two diabetes.

Already after a two-week training period, the glucose uptake in thigh muscles returned to a normal level.

The discovery was made in a research project led by Senior Research Fellow Kari Kalliokoski and Project Manager Jarna Hannukainen at the University of Turku, Finland.

The project studied the health impacts of high-intensity interval training on healthy people and diabetics.

Osteoporosis drug passes clinical trail

Osteoporosis drug passes clinical trail

A new study provides reassuring information about the short-term and long-term safety of denosumab, a monoclonal antibody that is used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis.

Adverse events that had been noted in a pivotal clinical trial in women age 60 to 90 years old treated for three years showed no tendency to increase after a further three years of treatment, the study showed.

In addition, women who crossed over from three years of placebo to three years of denosumab experienced no increase in adverse effects compared with women treated for the initial three years.

Study discloses risks of diabetics fasting during Ramadan

Study discloses risks of diabetics fasting during Ramadan

A new study examining the risk of fasting during Ramadan for people with type 1 diabetes compared blood glucose control and the rates of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia between users of insulin pump therapy versus multiple daily insulin injections.

The researchers report their findings in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics (DTT), a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

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