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Hepatitis B, C may heighten risk of Parkinson's disease later in life: Study

Hepatitis B, C may heighten risk of Parkinson's disease later in life: Study

A team of Briton researchers has found viruses of hepatitis B and C may increase the risk of developing a progressive disease of the nervous system marked by tremor, muscular rigidity and slow, imprecise movement later in life.

The findings, published in the online journal of Neurology®, indicated that people with hepatitis B were 76 percent more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, and people with hepatitis C were 51 percent more likely to develop it.

How treating traveler's diarrhea with antibiotic risks your health

How treating traveler's diarrhea with antibiotic risks your health

Turns out, antibiotic use for travelers' diarrhea favours particularly resistant super bacteria, increasing the patients' risk of getting an infection.

Every year, millions of travellers visit countries with poor hygiene, and approximately one third of them return home carrying antibiotic-resistant ESBL intestinal bacteria. Most of them remain unaware of this, as the bacteria cause no symptoms. High-risk areas for contracting ESBL bacteria are South and South-East Asia, Africa and Latin America.

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The fatter you are, the faster is aggressive breast cancer growth

The fatter you are, the faster is aggressive breast cancer growth

If you are overweight, you may want to shed those extra kilos as a recent study has found that the aggressive breast cancer grows faster in an obese environment.

It's not just what's inside breast cancer cells that matters, it's also the environment surrounding cancer cells that drives the disease, according to the researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Risky boozing may up among retirees

Risky boozing may up among retirees

Turns out, risky alcohol consumption can increase at the time of retirement.

Of retiring employees, 12 percent increased their risky drinking at the time of retirement. However, for most people, there was no change in risky level alcohol consumption around the time of retirement: 81 percent sustained healthy drinking during the follow-up, and in 7 percent of the participants risky drinking was constant, although they experienced a slow decline in risky level alcohol consumption after retirement.

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New find offers hope for some Hemophiliacs

New find offers hope for some Hemophiliacs

A team of researchers has improved the vectors for delivering human factor VIII (hFVIII) gene therapy to treat Hemophilia A.

The University of Pennsylvania study examined 42 combinations of promoters and enhancers for hFVIII gene expression to identify the optimal adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based gene therapy delivery vector constructs to take forward into development.

Evaluation of the different combinations in mice that lack factor VIII demonstrated the significant and differing effects the vector components had on liver-specific expression of the hFVIII transgene.

'Improved' wireless communication systems come closer to reality

'Improved' wireless communication systems come closer to reality

A team of scientists has paved the way for ultrafast and reconfigurable on-chip wireless communication systems with unmatched advantages in compactness, low power consumption and low fabrication complexity.

Researchers from the University of Sydney made a breakthrough achieving radio frequency signal control at sub-nanosecond time scales on a chip-scale optical device.

Radio frequency (RF) is a particular range of electromagnetic wave frequencies, widely used for communications and radar signals. The work should impact the current wireless revolution.

Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matter

Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matter

A new research has ruled out a challenge to the accepted standard model of the universe and theory of how galaxies form by shedding new light on a problematic structure.

The vast polar structure, a plane of satellite galaxies at the poles of the Milky Way, is at the center of a tug-of-war between scientists who disagree about the existence of mysterious dark matter, the invisible substance that, according to some scientists, comprises 85 percent of the mass of the universe.

More trees, less global warming? Not exactly

More trees, less global warming? Not exactly

Trees are considered as one of our biggest natural allies in the war against global warming, but in a new twist, scientists have found that the army of green is spewing out methane.

The University of Delaware study is one of the first in the world to show that tree trunks in upland forests actually emit methane rather than store it, representing a new, previously unaccounted source of this powerful greenhouse gas.

Methane is about 25 times stronger than carbon dioxide, with some estimates as high as 33 times stronger due to its effects when it is in the atmosphere.

Now, a method to measure potentially damaging cigarette smoke radicals

Now, a method to measure potentially damaging cigarette smoke radicals

A team of researchers has come up with a method for measuring free radicals, which are atoms or groups of atoms with unpaired electrons thought to be partly responsible for making smokers sick, and this could help improve the understanding of the relationship between these substances and health.

Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Understanding why is a challenge, given that cigarette smoke is a complex mixture of more than 7,000 compounds.

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