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Targeting hunger's complex chemistry for obesity drugs

Targeting hunger's complex chemistry for obesity drugs

A team of scientists is taking a new tack that could finally yield promising obesity treatments.

Contributing editor Jyoti Madhusoodanan reported that early attempts to therapeutically target leptin and ghrelin, which suppress and stimulate appetite, respectively, were mostly ineffective. But the hormones' discoveries paved the way to a deeper understanding of the chemistry of hunger.

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Common sanitisation practices for lettuce may not be sufficient

Common sanitisation practices for lettuce may not be sufficient

You may want to keep your plate devoid of romaine lettuce as a recent study has suggested that common sanitisation practises may not remove all the bacteria present from the crisp veggie.

The Purdue University study shows that the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes can live inside the tissue of romaine lettuce, suggesting that conventional post-harvest sanitization practices might not be sufficient to kill the potentially lethal pathogen.

Here`s how birds of a feather communicate while flocking together

Here`s how birds of a feather communicate while flocking together

A team of researchers has shed some light on how flying birds communicate with each other.

Zebra finches are social songbirds that use distance calls to establish contact with one another, similar to the way humans use speech to communicate.

Although it has been demonstrated that these birds can determine the identity of a caller as far away as 256 meters (or about 830 feet), it is not clear how their brain extracts this information from the call, which becomes degraded and loses intensity relative to the background noise as it travels through the environment.

Reusable carbon nanotubes, the next-gen water filter?

Reusable carbon nanotubes, the next-gen water filter?

A new class of carbon nanotubes may soon become the next-generation clean-up crew for toxic sludge and contaminated water, a new study suggested.

Enhanced single-walled carbon nanotubes offer a more effective and sustainable approach to water treatment and remediation than the standard industry materials, silicon gels and activated carbon, according to researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology.

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Software-based system can help determine cause of stroke

Software-based system can help determine cause of stroke

Determining the cause of an ischemic stroke is critical to prevent a second one and now, a new software-based system has offered hope.

Investigators at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the MGH Stroke Service have developed a software package that provides evidence-based, automated support for diagnosing the cause of stroke.

Now, tracing chemicals from fast-food wrappers in body possible

Now, tracing chemicals from fast-food wrappers in body possible

A team of researchers has come up with a technique that has made tracing hazardous chemicals from fast-food wrappers in the body possible.

The University of Alabama and the University of Notre Dame scientists have developed a new method that enables researchers to radiolabel three forms of perfluorinated and polyfluorinated alkyl substances and track the fate of these chemicals when they enter the body.

Just 100 grams of protein daily reduces heart disease, cancer risk in old age: study

Just 100 grams of protein daily reduces heart disease, cancer risk in old age: study

For a longer life, eat higher proportion of carbohydrates - grains, pulses, vegetables, sweet potato - and about 100 grams of protein in middle-age daily to cut the chances of heart disease, cancer and other diseases in old age, suggests a study.

According to researchers, diet comprising 80 percent carbohydrates - mainly vegetables, especially sweet potato, 10 percent protein - fish and soy and 10 percent fat - is thought to contribute to their longevity.

Teens who smoke pot at 15 or below may suffer memory loss, respiratory diseases

Teens who smoke pot at 15 or below may suffer memory loss, respiratory diseases

A team of Canadian researchers has found that teenagers, who begin smoking pot as early as 15 or younger, may suffer long-term cognitive impairment, memory loss, physical illnesses and respiratory diseases.

The findings, published in the journal Health, shows that young users, who smoked pot, reported the most impact to their physical and mental health and those who did not smoke until age 21, are unlikely to develop a lifelong habit, or barely smoke pot at all.

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