Health

Urban living makes asthma worse for children, study finds

Urban living makes asthma worse for children, study finds

According to a new study, living in urban areas can make asthma worse for your children.

These findings were published in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The study shows that urban living is a strong independent risk factor for increased asthma morbidity -- defined as higher rates of asthma-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations -- but urban living does not increase the risk for having asthma.

Just a cup of tea daily may lower risk of dementia

Just a cup of tea daily may lower risk of dementia

Good news for tea lovers, as a study finds drinking just one cup of tea daily may significantly lower the risk of dementia by 50 percent.

The findings, published in journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, indicate that those carrying the gene of dementia can also slash their likelihood of developing toxic clumps in their brain by as much as 86 percent.

Researchers finds warfarin alternative which helps dialysis patients

Researchers finds warfarin alternative which helps dialysis patients

Dialysis Patients, we might have some good news for you.

A new research suggests that an alternative to warfarin, if given in low capacity to dialysis patients, can be maintained in the blood at safe levels to prevent higher risks of stroke.

The findings are published in Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN).

A serving of broccoli a day keeps prostate cancer at bay

A serving of broccoli a day keeps prostate cancer at bay

Your mother was right when she said, "finish your broccoli and you will stay healthy," a new study has suggested.

The Oregon State University researchers found that sulforaphane, a dietary compound from broccoli that's known to help prevent prostate cancer, may work through its influence on long, non-coding RNAs. This is another step forward in a compelling new area of study on the underlying genetics of cancer development and progression.

This blood test can detect autism years earlier

This blood test can detect autism years earlier

A simple blood test that could detect autism in children has come closer to reality.

An algorithm based on levels of metabolites found in a blood sample can accurately predict whether a child is on the Autism spectrum of disorder (ASD), based upon a recent study. The algorithm, developed by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is the first physiological test for autism and opens the door to earlier diagnosis and potential future development of therapeutics.

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Noisy lives putting Americans at risk for hearing loss

Noisy lives putting Americans at risk for hearing loss

The risk of hearing loss from exposure to noises is all around us every day and now, a recent study

has found that 58 million Americans are exposed to loud and frequent sounds.

The Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers found that substantial noise exposures, with potential long-term hearing effects, commonly

occur in occupational and recreational settings and only a small percentage of those exposed are consistently wearing recommended hearing protection.

Kids with high uric acid at higher risk of BP at age seven: Study

Kids with high uric acid at higher risk of BP at age seven: Study

A recent study reveals, babies, especially preterm ones, with high levels of serum uric acid during early years of life, may be associated with high blood pressure at the age of seven, further leading to hypertension in adulthood.

The study further says, this high level of serum uric acid at very early years in tots, is a result of the in-utero environment.

Did you know female cyberbullies feel negative about school and learning?

Did you know female cyberbullies feel negative about school and learning?

Sending and receiving threatening, offensive comments, images or videos on social media can trigger negative perceptions for the importance of school and learning, especially among female teenagers, finds a study.

According to researchers from Nottingham Trent University in England, 11-15 year-old girls who were most involved in cyberbullying -- as perpetrator, victim, or both -- felt the least accepted by their peers.

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