Research

Dear men, eating spinach, pumpkin seeds, yogurt can prevent hip fractures

Dear men, eating spinach, pumpkin seeds, yogurt can prevent hip fractures

Eat spinach, pumpkin seeds, yogurt and almonds in middle to elder age, as a study finds that people, especially men, who lack food rich in magnesium in their diet, are at an increased risk of fractures, particularly fractures of the hip.

According to researchers, magnesium could hold the key to preventing one of the most preventable causes of disability in middle-aged to elderly people.

Soon, a Parkinson's disease cure

Soon, a Parkinson's disease cure

A team of researchers has brought a cure for Parkinson's disease closer to reality.

Palmitoylethanolamide, an endogenous fatty acid amide signalling molecule well-known for its ability to promote the resolution of neuroinflammation and exert neuroprotection, has shown potential therapeutic action in such animal models.

The research showed that ultra-micronized palmitoylethanolamide (um-PEA), slows down disease progression and disability when used as add-on therapy in advanced PD patients.

Soon, a treatment for aggressive brain cancer in kids

Soon, a treatment for aggressive brain cancer in kids

A team of researchers has discovered a promising target to treat atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour (AT/RT), a highly aggressive and therapy resistant brain tumour that mostly occurs in infants.

Using state-of-the-art gene editing technology, the scientists from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that these tumours' growth and tendency to metastasize are regulated by a protein kinase called Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), which is increased in AT/RT.

They also have demonstrated that an experimental drug, a PLK4 inhibitor, stopped tumour growth.

26 novel genes linked to intellectual disability

26 novel genes linked to intellectual disability

A team of researchers have identified 26 new genes linked to intellectual disability.

The study at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and Queen's University has implications for the diagnosis and clinical care of those affected, and also adds to our growing knowledge of brain development and functioning.

It may eventually lead to personalised treatments for affected individuals. Interestingly, some of the genes identified are thought to be connected with autism spectrum disorders.

Sewer workers could be at Ebola risk with current guidelines

Sewer workers could be at Ebola risk with current guidelines

Turns out, the guidelines from the U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization might not go far enough to protect sewer workers from Ebola virus.

Research from Drexel University and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that the sewer workers downstream of hospitals and treatment centres could contract Ebola via inhalation.

The study takes the first steps toward understanding the risk that this untreated waste poses to the people in the water treatment process who work in close proximity to it.

Role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort: Study

Role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort: Study

While it may be done for a good cause, a recent study reveals that disability simulations often result in feelings of fear, apprehension and pity toward those with disabilities.

Professionals in the fields of education and rehabilitation psychology have long used disability simulations to try to promote understanding and improve attitudes about persons with disabilities.

Researchers discover a protein to provide protection from cancer, HIV

Researchers discover a protein to provide protection from cancer, HIV

A team of US researchers has discovered a protein that can help the vaccinations be more effective and provide protection from cancer, HIV and influenza.

Researchers from Boston University's school of medicine purified a protein - called PorB - found on the exterior of bacteria (neisseria meningidis) and used it as an accessory to provide a better vaccination response.

High-intensity interval training improves glucose metabolism of diabetics

High-intensity interval training improves glucose metabolism of diabetics

New research reveals that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) increases glucose metabolism in muscles as well as insulin sensitivity in type two diabetes.

Already after a two-week training period, the glucose uptake in thigh muscles returned to a normal level.

The discovery was made in a research project led by Senior Research Fellow Kari Kalliokoski and Project Manager Jarna Hannukainen at the University of Turku, Finland.

The project studied the health impacts of high-intensity interval training on healthy people and diabetics.

Ever wondered why you crave junk when tired?

Ever wondered why you crave junk when tired?

Whenever we are tried, instead of opting for a healthier option such as a fruit, most of us prefer that favourite chocolate bar or packet of biscuits. Ever wondered why?

Researchers at Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University in Chicago recently presented their results of a study looking into the effects of sleep deprivation upon high-calorific food consumption at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society's annual meeting in San Francisco, reports Science News.

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