Research

Osteoporosis drug passes clinical trail

Osteoporosis drug passes clinical trail

A new study provides reassuring information about the short-term and long-term safety of denosumab, a monoclonal antibody that is used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis.

Adverse events that had been noted in a pivotal clinical trial in women age 60 to 90 years old treated for three years showed no tendency to increase after a further three years of treatment, the study showed.

In addition, women who crossed over from three years of placebo to three years of denosumab experienced no increase in adverse effects compared with women treated for the initial three years.

Study discloses risks of diabetics fasting during Ramadan

Study discloses risks of diabetics fasting during Ramadan

A new study examining the risk of fasting during Ramadan for people with type 1 diabetes compared blood glucose control and the rates of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia between users of insulin pump therapy versus multiple daily insulin injections.

The researchers report their findings in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics (DTT), a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

Men, take note! Grey hair linked with risk of heart disease

Men, take note! Grey hair linked with risk of heart disease

In a recent study presented at EuroPrevent 2017.1, grey hair has been linked with an increased risk of heart disease in men.

"Ageing is an unavoidable coronary risk factor and is associated with dermatological signs that could signal increased risk," said Dr Irini Samuel, a cardiologist at Cairo University, Egypt.

"More research is needed on cutaneous signs of risk that would enable us to intervene earlier in the cardiovascular disease process."

Researchers discover rescue protein that delays cell death

Researchers discover rescue protein that delays cell death

A team of researchers has discovered a rescue protein that delays the cell death and can offer a treatment for cancer, neurodegeneration and infection.

The study was published in journal Cell.

The team has discovered how a set of proteins delays the "executioner" machinery that kills damaged or infected cells in a process called necroptosis.

The scientists believe these finding may have wide clinical implications if researchers can develop drugs to control the cellular rescue machinery.

New medication can reduce involuntary movement

New medication can reduce involuntary movement

A team of researchers has found that a new medication significantly decreases involuntary movement.

Antipsychotic treatment can cause involuntary movements such as lip smacking, tongue protrusions and excessive eye blinking. These movements typically occur after more than 3 months of treatment and are called tardive dyskinesia.

The study concludes valbenazine administered once daily can significantly reduce tardive dyskinesia in patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and mood disorder.

High-intensity interval training, a weapon in war against diabetes

High-intensity interval training, a weapon in war against diabetes

A new research has revealed that high-intensity interval training (HIIT), where short bursts of activity are mixed with rest periods, increases glucose metabolism in muscles as well as insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes.

Already after a two-week training period, the glucose uptake in thigh muscles returned to a normal level.

The project from the University of Turku, Finland, studied the health impacts of high-intensity interval training on healthy people and diabetics, and the results are encouraging.

Asthma drug may be the solution to chronic hives

Asthma drug may be the solution to chronic hives

Chronic hives sufferers can breathe a sigh of relief as a recent study has found that a drug already used to treat moderate to severe allergic asthma can help them.

Patients who develop itchy wheals in response to cold or friction benefit from treatment with omalizumab, a drug normally used to treat asthma. Two separate clinical studies, conducted by researchers from Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, have shown the drug's active substance to be highly effective against different types of urticaria (hives).

Yoga can help ward off prostate cancer therapy side effects

Yoga can help ward off prostate cancer therapy side effects

Turns out, warding off the side effects of radiation treatment in prostate cancer patients is as simple as doing twice-weekly yoga.

Men who attended a structured yoga class twice a week during prostate cancer radiation treatment reported less fatigue and better sexual and urinary function than those who didn't, according to a clinical trial led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

It is the first randomized trial to look at the effect of twice-weekly yoga on the side-effects and quality of life issues caused by prostate cancer treatment.

Married couples with shared ancestry tend to have same genes

Married couples with shared ancestry tend to have same genes

Turns out, genes may be at play when two married people start appearing similar.

When two married people appear similar, it isn't necessarily a coincidence, but may be related to the tendency to marry someone with the same ancestry; a trend that can have important effects on the genetics of different populations, report Ronnie Sebro of the University of Pennsylvania, and senior authors Josee Dupuis from the Boston University School of Public Health and Neil Risch from the University of California, San Francisco.

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