Research

Yoga can help ward off prostate cancer therapy side effects

Yoga can help ward off prostate cancer therapy side effects

Turns out, warding off the side effects of radiation treatment in prostate cancer patients is as simple as doing twice-weekly yoga.

Men who attended a structured yoga class twice a week during prostate cancer radiation treatment reported less fatigue and better sexual and urinary function than those who didn't, according to a clinical trial led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

It is the first randomized trial to look at the effect of twice-weekly yoga on the side-effects and quality of life issues caused by prostate cancer treatment.

Married couples with shared ancestry tend to have same genes

Married couples with shared ancestry tend to have same genes

Turns out, genes may be at play when two married people start appearing similar.

When two married people appear similar, it isn't necessarily a coincidence, but may be related to the tendency to marry someone with the same ancestry; a trend that can have important effects on the genetics of different populations, report Ronnie Sebro of the University of Pennsylvania, and senior authors Josee Dupuis from the Boston University School of Public Health and Neil Risch from the University of California, San Francisco.

Third-hand smoke, a hidden danger for kids

Third-hand smoke, a hidden danger for kids

Children may carry significant levels of nicotine on their hands just by coming into contact with items or surfaces contaminated with tobacco smoke residues, even when no one is actively smoking around them at the time, according to a recent study.

The current study at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and San Diego State University involved 25 children and is being followed up by a larger analysis of exposure data collected from more than 700 additional children, according to the researchers.

Pets can help ward off obesity, allergy

Pets can help ward off obesity, allergy

You may want to gift a dog to your baby as a recent study has suggested that a pet early in life may alter gut bacteria in immune-boosting ways.

The University of Alberta study showed that babies from families with pets--70 per cent of which were dogs--showed higher levels of two types of microbes associated with lower risks of allergic disease and obesity.

But don't rush out to adopt a furry friend just yet.

Here`s how HeartMate 3 is better than HeartMate II

Here`s how HeartMate 3 is better than HeartMate II

Patients on HeartMate 3 have fewer blood-related events than those on HeartMate II, according to a recent study.

A six-month analysis of the pivotal MOMENTUM 3 trial found that patients implanted with the new HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist system (LVAS) had fewer adverse clotting and bleeding events than patients implanted with the control, HeartMate II LVAS.

Soon, personalised therapies for prostate cancer

Soon, personalised therapies for prostate cancer

Biomarker could lead to personalized therapies for prostate cancer, according to a recent study.

In 2016, more than 181,000 new cases of prostate cancer were reported in the U.S., according to the American Cancer Society. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is one of the earliest ways clinicians can detect prostate cancers in their patients. Sometimes, a high PSA level may be a sign of benign conditions such as inflammation; therefore, more reliable tests are under investigation to help urologists diagnose and treat the disease in an aging population.

This chemical reaction in eye can boost your vision

This chemical reaction in eye can boost your vision

A team of researchers has discovered a chemical reaction in the eye that may improve vision.

A light-sensing pigment found in everything from bacteria to vertebrates can be biochemically manipulated to reset itself, an important therapeutic advantage, according to the research from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

People with normal weight can also have high cardiovascular risks, suggests Study

People with normal weight can also have high cardiovascular risks, suggests Study

Are you one of those who thought, having normal weight will save you from cardiovascular problems? Well, we might have some bad news for you.

A recent study has found that approximately one-third of all individuals with a normal body mass index (BMI) had cardio-metabolic risk factors for heart disease, especially those of South Asian and Hispanic descent.

The study was published in journal Annals of Internal Medicines.

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