Research

Community based clubs help improve heart-health in black women: Study

Community based clubs help improve heart-health in black women: Study

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for Black/African American women in the US and more Black/African American women die every year from heart disease compared to their white and Hispanic counterparts, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

A pilot study, led by researchers at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, aimed to address this disparity by investigating the impact of engaging Black/African American women in "Change Clubs" on measures of heart health.

Gang warfare not unique to humans - banded mongooses do it too

Gang warfare not unique to humans - banded mongooses do it too

Researchers from the University of Exeter have shed light on the causes of the fights - and found they are most common when females are receptive to breeding and when there is competition over food and territory.

The study has been published in the journal Animal Behaviour. The scientists, who studied a population of banded mongooses in Uganda, observed ferocious fighting between groups that often led to serious injury and even death.

Despite negative influence, people can't stop using social media: Study

Despite negative influence, people can't stop using social media: Study

We know it isn't good for our health but being glued to our smartphone is something we all just can't resist.

A study reports that nearly half of millennials fear their addiction to social media is having a negative effect on their mental and physical health.

A new survey by the American Psychological Association (APA) found about 90 percent of people aged 18-29 were using social media, up from just 12 percent in 2005.

Sleeping with stuffed toys help children to read: Study

Sleeping with stuffed toys help children to read: Study

Sending stuffed animals for a sleepover at the library encourages children to read with them, even long after the sleepover took place, say researchers in a new study in Heliyon.

For the first time, the study proves stuffed animal sleepovers are an effective way to get children to read.

The results also suggest that stuffed animal sleepover programs may help develop children's prosocial behavior by encouraging them to read the books the stuffed animals had chosen during their sleepover.

Fruit flies can build resistance to toxins, found in deadly mushrooms: Study

Fruit flies can build resistance to toxins, found in deadly mushrooms: Study

A new study says fruit flies can build resistance to the toxins found in deadly mushrooms - Death Cap and Destroying Angel that may help them live longer.

According to researchers from Michigan Technological University in the U.S, fruit fly species have adapted many niche preferences, such as a tolerance for alpha-amanitin, a toxin found in the Amanita genus of poisonous mushrooms.

Their results were published by PLOS ONE.

Patients with chronic pain prefer marijuana over prescribed drugs: Study

Patients with chronic pain prefer marijuana over prescribed drugs: Study

Canadian researchers revealed many people with chronic pain and those taking mental health medicines prefer cannabis over their prescribed medication.

This may be due to the feeling that marijuana is safer than prescription drugs.

The study has appeared in journal of Drug Policy.

Lead author of the study, Philippe Lucas, from University of Victoria, reasoned as to why they switch to cannabis from prescribed meds.

Women should eat nutrient-enriched diet to have long term benefits!

Women should eat nutrient-enriched diet to have long term benefits!

A study finds, eating nutrient-enriched diet during adolescence or childhood development may alter long-term behaviour and learning among ladies.

It also added that it can even "rescue" females from the negative effects of behaviour, resulting from a poor maternal diet during pregnancy.

The study appeared online in The FASEB Journal.

"So many effects during pregnancy have been touted as irreversible--perhaps not always so,: said Thoru Pederson.

Alzheimer's drug shouldn't be prescribed for cognitive impairment, without genetic test

Alzheimer's drug shouldn't be prescribed for cognitive impairment, without genetic test

US researchers have warned, Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer's disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment, without a genetic test.

Researchers from the University Of California discovered that for people who carry a specific genetic variation, the K-variant of butyrylcholinesterase, or BChE-K donezpezil, could accelerate cognitive decline.

The study has been published in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Want to stay fit? Interactive health apps may inspire you

Want to stay fit? Interactive health apps may inspire you

Good news for those who want to lose weight without hitting gym or consulting a dietitian!

An online risk assessment website with good but controlled communication skills can promote healthy lifestyles, suggest a study.

In a study, people who experienced a back-and-forth interaction with an online health risk assessment website, were more likely to follow the health behaviours suggested by the tool, according to S. Shyam Sundar from Pennsylvania State University in the US.

Live in green neighbourhood to cut depression, anxiety

Live in green neighbourhood to cut depression, anxiety

Your neighbourhood is linked to your mental well-being.

Briton researchers have revealed, living in neighbourhoods with more birds, shrubs and trees are less likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and stress.

The study, involving hundreds of people, found benefits for mental health of being able to see birds, shrubs and trees around the home, whether people lived in urban or more leafy suburban neighbourhoods.

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