Research

Non-monogamous relationships are just as successful as monogamous: Study

Non-monogamous relationships are just as successful as monogamous: Study

From our very young age, we're told cheating is wrong and we should all be faithful to our partners.

We are brought up to believe relationships should be monogamous. But does monogamy really make sense? Or is it just something ingrained in us?

In fact, the concept of monogamy is such a deep-rooted in our minds that we unknowingly we have an unconscious biasness towards it.

Allergic to any tree nut? Don't worry, now you can eat some

Allergic to any tree nut? Don't worry, now you can eat some

If you have a particular tree nut allergy, then generally you are being asked to avoid every kind of nuts.

But now, a new research suggests that you should consider having an oral food challenge to properly diagnose additional nut allergies, especially if you've never had a reaction to eating those almonds, chestnuts and pistachios before.

German Shepherds can detect breast cancer accurately: Study

German Shepherds can detect breast cancer accurately: Study

Attention dog lovers! With just six months of training, a German Shepherd can accurately detect breast cancer, a study finds.

According to researchers, the technique is simple, non-invasive and cheap and may revolutionise cancer detection in countries where mammograms are hard to come by.

The results revealed, in the first experiment, the dogs detected 28 out of the 31 cancerous bandages - a 90 percent pass rate.

On the second try, they scored 100 percent - sitting down in front of the box containing the cancerous sample with their muzzle pressed deep into the cone.

Ask grandparents to keep doing housework, to keep heart attack at bay

Ask grandparents to keep doing housework, to keep heart attack at bay

After a heart attack, ask your grandparents to make their bed, do laundry or carry groceries as it may start the road to recovery soon, suggests a study.

According to researchers, a daily walk is proven to be beneficial, and tai chi, yoga and balance training can also help, but encouraging patients to do more chores around the house is the simplest way to get people moving.

The study published by the American Heart Association said patients should be encouraged to do everyday household chores instead of simply given medication.

Video games help to fight depression?

Video games help to fight depression?

Do you know video game can be an effective treatment if your child is undergoing depression?

A new UC Davis study carries it a step further, though, finding that when the video game users were messaged reminders, they played the game more often and in some cases increased the time spent playing.

"Through the use of carefully designed persuasive message prompts ... mental health video games can be perceived and used as a more viable and less attrition-ridden treatment option," according to the study.

Just 10 minutes of play a day can keep cardiometabolic risk at bay

Just 10 minutes of play a day can keep cardiometabolic risk at bay

A new study has found that as little as 10 minutes a day of high-intensity physical activity could help some children reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases such as diabetes.

The researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center found that replacing light-intensity physical activity with brief periods of vigorous exercise may provide significant cardiometabolic benefits in young people with relatively large waist measurements and elevated levels of insulin in their blood.

Prescription weight-loss pill helps with opiate addiction

Prescription weight-loss pill helps with opiate addiction

A prescription weight-loss medication can decrease the urge to use opiates such as oxycodone, according to a recent study.

The researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that the drug, lorcaserin, reduced the use and craving for the opioid oxycodone in preclinical studies.

Most of the treatments available to reduce opiate misuse work by occupying opioid receptors in the brain. If someone were to take an opiate while on these treatments, they would not feel the signature euphoria as strongly.

Genetic discovery offers hope for Alzheimer's disease

Genetic discovery offers hope for Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers has discovered a new gene that is associated with Tau accumulation, which is one of the defining features of Alzheimer disease (AD).

Investigators at BWH and Rush University Medical Center described the identification and validation of a genetic variant within the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-type delta (PTPRD) gene.

Tau accumulates in several different conditions in addition to AD, including certain forms of dementia and Parkinsonian syndromes as well as chronic traumatic encephalopathy that occur with repeated head injuries.

Brain 'switch' to improve blood circulation identified

Brain 'switch' to improve blood circulation identified

All it takes is the flip of a protein "switch" within the tiny wire-like capillaries of the brain to increase the blood flow that ensures optimal brain function.

A new research has uncovered that capillaries have the capacity to both sense brain activity and generate an electrical vasodilatory signal to evoke blood flow and direct nutrients to nourish hard-working neurons.

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