Research

Virus hydrophobicity can help purify vaccines

Virus hydrophobicity can help purify vaccines

A team of researchers has found that hydrophobic proteins on virus surfaces can help purify vaccines.

The complex structures making the surface of a virus are small weaves of proteins that make a big impact on how a virus interacts with cells and its environment.

A slight change in protein sequence makes this surface slightly water-repelling, or hydrophobic, causing it to stick to other hydrophobic surfaces. A new paper, published recently in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, details surface hydrophobicity in porcine parovirus (PPV).

Survivors of childhood brain tumours have more fat

Survivors of childhood brain tumours have more fat

A team of researchers has shed light on why survivors of childhood brain tumours may be prone to heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and early death.

The McMaster University researchers discovered that while survivors of childhood brain tumours have a similar Body Mass Index (BMI) to healthy children with no cancer, they have more fat tissue overall, and especially around the abdomen.

Did you know? Blind have enhanced hearing, smell, cognitive functions

Did you know? Blind have enhanced hearing, smell, cognitive functions

A study finds that people who are born blind have heightened sense of hearing, smell and touch, suggesting that their brain "rewires" itself in the absence of visual information to boost other senses.

According to Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers, the brains of those, who are born blind make new connections in the absence of visual information, resulting in enhanced, compensatory abilities such as a heightened sense of hearing, smell and touch, as well as cognitive functions.

A new species of terrestrial crab found in Hong Kong

A new species of terrestrial crab found in Hong Kong

What the CRAB!

The scientists have found a new species of terrestrial crab, climbing trees on the eastern coast of Hong Kong.

The species is described in the open access journal ZooKeys.

All specimens spotted during the survey have been collected at a height of approximately 1.5 - 1.8 m, walking on the bark of the branches at ebbing and low tides.

The characteristics of the newly found species are squarish predominantly dark brown carapace, very long legs and orange chelipeds.

Weaker non-medical exemption policies reduce likelihood of measles outbreak: Study

Weaker non-medical exemption policies reduce likelihood of measles outbreak: Study

According to a new study, places which have weaker non-medical exemption policies for vaccinations can reduce the likelihood of a measles outbreak 140 to 190 percent by strengthening them.

The research was published in Academic Pediatrics.

The researchers also found, that the magnitude of these outbreaks can also be cut in half by strengthening exemption policies for children.

Insulin resistance linked with cognitive performance: Study

Insulin resistance linked with cognitive performance: Study

Higher level of blood sugar and insulin resistance, accompanied by obesity and physical inactivity, is also linked to more rapid decline in cognitive performance, says a new study.

The study, by Tel Aviv University, finds that both diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance experienced accelerated cognitive decline in executive function and memory.

The research, published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, was jointly led by Prof. David Tanne and Prof. Uri Goldbourt and conducted by Dr. Miri Lutski, all of TAU's Sackler School of Medicine.

Dear parents! Store prescription opioids away, out of sight of kids of all ages

Dear parents! Store prescription opioids away, out of sight of kids of all ages

Dear adults, opioids prescribed cautiously for chronic pain should be stored up, away and out of sight of kids of all ages, in a locked cabinet is best, as a study finds most of the exposures occurred among children younger than five years were 60 percent and teenagers was 30 percent.

The researchers call for changes to prescribing practices, increased education about safe storage at home.

Risk score tools can improve stroke prediction in atrial fibrillation patients

Risk score tools can improve stroke prediction in atrial fibrillation patients

A study finds that by combining two independent, scientifically-proven risk measurements, physicians can better predict a patient's irregular and often very fast heart rate risk of stroke or death.

According to researchers from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, US, these tools can help to determine the need for blood thinners in treatment.

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