Science

NASA eyes intensifying tropical cyclone 'Frances'

NASA eyes intensifying tropical cyclone 'Frances'

Two NASA satellites have provided forecasters in Australia with visible and rainfall data as tropical cyclone 'Frances' strengthened in the western Timor Sea.

NASA's Aqua satellite has captured a visible image of the storm that showed a cloud-filled eye, while the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite found heaving rainfall occurring.

Frances formed north of Melville Island, Australia on April 27, 2017.

Frances has been gradually intensifying while moving south-southwestward through the Timor Sea.

Researchers relate extreme weather to global warming

Researchers relate extreme weather to global warming

In the past, scientists typically avoided linking individual weather events to climate change, citing the challenges of teasing apart human influence from the natural variability of the weather. But that is changing.

"Over the past decade, there's been an explosion of research, to the point that we are seeing results released within a few weeks of a major event," said Diffenbaugh, who is also the Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

What lies beneath the surface? Here is the answer

What lies beneath the surface? Here is the answer

Walking down a grassy field, have you ever wondered that what lies beneath the surface?

We finally have an answer to that question.

A web of plant roots interacts symbiotically with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that extend their hyphae from the root system further into the earth, accessing nutrients such as phosphates to give to the plant in return for carbohydrates.

The study was published in journal Current Biology.

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'Improved' wireless communication systems come closer to reality

'Improved' wireless communication systems come closer to reality

A team of scientists has paved the way for ultrafast and reconfigurable on-chip wireless communication systems with unmatched advantages in compactness, low power consumption and low fabrication complexity.

Researchers from the University of Sydney made a breakthrough achieving radio frequency signal control at sub-nanosecond time scales on a chip-scale optical device.

Radio frequency (RF) is a particular range of electromagnetic wave frequencies, widely used for communications and radar signals. The work should impact the current wireless revolution.

Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matter

Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matter

A new research has ruled out a challenge to the accepted standard model of the universe and theory of how galaxies form by shedding new light on a problematic structure.

The vast polar structure, a plane of satellite galaxies at the poles of the Milky Way, is at the center of a tug-of-war between scientists who disagree about the existence of mysterious dark matter, the invisible substance that, according to some scientists, comprises 85 percent of the mass of the universe.

More trees, less global warming? Not exactly

More trees, less global warming? Not exactly

Trees are considered as one of our biggest natural allies in the war against global warming, but in a new twist, scientists have found that the army of green is spewing out methane.

The University of Delaware study is one of the first in the world to show that tree trunks in upland forests actually emit methane rather than store it, representing a new, previously unaccounted source of this powerful greenhouse gas.

Methane is about 25 times stronger than carbon dioxide, with some estimates as high as 33 times stronger due to its effects when it is in the atmosphere.

Common sanitisation practices for lettuce may not be sufficient

Common sanitisation practices for lettuce may not be sufficient

You may want to keep your plate devoid of romaine lettuce as a recent study has suggested that common sanitisation practises may not remove all the bacteria present from the crisp veggie.

The Purdue University study shows that the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes can live inside the tissue of romaine lettuce, suggesting that conventional post-harvest sanitization practices might not be sufficient to kill the potentially lethal pathogen.

Here`s how birds of a feather communicate while flocking together

Here`s how birds of a feather communicate while flocking together

A team of researchers has shed some light on how flying birds communicate with each other.

Zebra finches are social songbirds that use distance calls to establish contact with one another, similar to the way humans use speech to communicate.

Although it has been demonstrated that these birds can determine the identity of a caller as far away as 256 meters (or about 830 feet), it is not clear how their brain extracts this information from the call, which becomes degraded and loses intensity relative to the background noise as it travels through the environment.

Reusable carbon nanotubes, the next-gen water filter?

Reusable carbon nanotubes, the next-gen water filter?

A new class of carbon nanotubes may soon become the next-generation clean-up crew for toxic sludge and contaminated water, a new study suggested.

Enhanced single-walled carbon nanotubes offer a more effective and sustainable approach to water treatment and remediation than the standard industry materials, silicon gels and activated carbon, according to researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology.

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