Science

Meet the new moth named after Donald Trump

Meet the new moth named after Donald Trump

To encourage the conservation in the fragile areas, scientists have named a new moth as 'Neopalpa donaldtrumpi' in the honour of U.S President-elect Donald Trump.

Biologist Dr. Vazrick Nazari from University of California named the moth officially as ' Neopalpa donaldtrumpi' because it stands out with yellowish-white scales present on the head in adults and in these scales he found an amusing reference to Trump's hairstyle and turned it into an additional justification for its name.

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Scientists discover 'BioClay' for pest-free crops

Scientists discover 'BioClay' for pest-free crops

Scientists, including an Indian-origin researcher, have found a nano-sized degradable clay, an alternative to chemicals and pesticides, that protects plants from specific disease-causing pathogens.

Researcher Neena Mitter from University of Queensland in Australia said BioClay - an environmentally sustainable alternative to chemicals and pesticides - could be a game-changer for crop protection.

The study was recently published in Nature Plants.

Songbirds divorce, flee, fail to reproduce due to suburban sprawl

Songbirds divorce, flee, fail to reproduce due to suburban sprawl

Songbirds divorce, pack up and leave and miss their best chances for successful reproduction, courtesy suburban development.

As forested areas increasingly are converted to suburbs, birds that live on the edge of our urban footprint, must find new places to build their nests, breed and raise fledglings.

New research published in the journal PLOS ONE, finds that for one group of songbirds, called "avoiders," urban sprawl is kicking them out of their territory, forcing divorce and stunting their ability to find new mates and reproduce successfully, even after relocating.

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How do conch shells have such huge variety?

How do conch shells have such huge variety?

Conch shells and its varied shapes and size have always been something that has captivated the eyes of collectors.

And with more than 50,000 estimated living species bearing a shell, scientists who study the phylum Mollusca have long sought to understand the molecular underpinnings behind the beautiful array of shell patterns and colors.

Your emotional experience can affect how you remember future events

Your emotional experience can affect how you remember future events

Researchers in the United States have found that an emotional experience, which persists for over 20 to 30 minutes, can influence how you remember future experiences.

The study, which appeared in the journal Nature Neuroscience, also showed that this emotional " hangover" influences how we attend and remember future experiences.

"How we remember events is not just a consequence of the external world we experience, but is also strongly influenced by our internal state and these internal states can persist and color future experiences," said senior study author Lila Davachi.

Study maps how brain recognise extensively varied faces at one go

Study maps how brain recognise extensively varied faces at one go

Ever wondered how can you recognise whether your friend is happy or sad, at a glance? Also how can you recognise a friend, even if you haven't seen him/her in a decade?

Answering to all these, a recent study finds out how the brain recognise familiar faces with efficiency and ease, despite extensive variation in how they appear.

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in the US are closer than ever before to understand the neural basis of facial identification.

Good news! Scientists identify new approach to recycle greenhouse gas

Good news! Scientists identify new approach to recycle greenhouse gas

A team of researchers has discovered a key enzyme effective to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon monoxide (CO) that can be adapted for commercial applications like biofuel synthesis.

The study was published online in journal of Nature Chemical Biology.

Researchers found that they could successfully express the reductase component of the nitrogenase enzyme alone in the bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii and directly use this bacterium to convert CO2 to CO.

Festive Nebulae emission captured by Hubble Telescope

Festive Nebulae emission captured by Hubble Telescope

The sheer observing power of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is usually undermined.

Recently, NASA and ESA owned HST captured two festive-looking emission nebulae. Intense radiation from the brilliant central stars caused hydrogen in the nebulae to glow pink.

The glowing pink nebula, an interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other gases, named 'NGC 248', is located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, which is a dwarf-sized galaxy, just about 200 thousand light-years away and yet is still visible in great detail.

Ancient DNA reveals genetic legacy of pandemics in the Americas

Ancient DNA reveals genetic legacy of pandemics in the Americas

Tuberculosis, treponemal disease, Chagas disease, and many other pathogens were endemic to populations of Prehistoric America. But the "Columbian Exchange" beginning in 1492 introduced new pathogens to American populations, including smallpox, measles, influenza, and yellow fever.

This introduction had devastating consequences for tribes. Infectious diseases resulted in the depopulation of complete regions, leading to the collapse of social, economic, and political institutions, and the loss of many traditional cultural practices and ways of life.

Astronomers release largest digital survey of visible Universe

Astronomers release largest digital survey of visible Universe

The world's largest digital survey of the visible universe, mapping billions of stars and galaxies, has been publicly released.

The data has been made available by the international Pan-STARRS project, which includes scientists from Queen's University Belfast and the Universities of Durham and Edinburgh along with NASA and the National Science Foundation, who have predicted that it will lead to new discoveries about the universe.

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