Science

World's wet regions are getting wetter, dry regions are getting drier

World's wet regions are getting wetter, dry regions are getting drier

Research from the University of Southampton has provided robust evidence that wet regions of the earth are getting wetter and dry regions are getting drier but it is happening at a slower rate than previously thought.

The study, published in Scientific Reports, analysed the saltiness of the world's oceans.

More rain and outflow from rivers in a region of an ocean means sea water gets diluted and therefore becomes less salty. More evaporation in another region takes away fresh water and leaves salt behind making that region more saline.

Monkeys in Brazil unintentionally carve tools used by humans, 4300 years ago

Monkeys in Brazil unintentionally carve tools used by humans, 4300 years ago

A recent study found that the Bearded or Black-Striped Capuchin (Sapajus libidinosus), a species of wild monkey found in Brazil, makes sharp stone flakes by strongly and repeatedly hammering one rock against another embedded in an outcrop with a clear intent to smash it.

Monkeys observed performing this activity then lick and sniff the quartz dust resulting from the fragmentation of the rock.

This behavior by S. libidinosus frequently produces sharp-edged conchoidal flakes with smooth rounded facets resembling the shape of a scallop shell.

Rise in methane emissions may hamper efforts to slow climate change

Rise in methane emissions may hamper efforts to slow climate change

A recent research published in the journal Environmental Research Letters highlights that global concentrations of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas and cause of climate change, are now growing faster in the atmosphere than at any other time in the past two decades.

The researchers reported that methane concentrations in the air began to surge around 2007 and grew precipitously in 2014 and 2015. In that two-year period, concentrations shot up by 10 or more parts per billion annually.

Wind farms limit carbon emission: Study

Wind farms limit carbon emission: Study

A recent study published in Energy Policy journal shows wind farms have made a significant impact in limiting carbon emissions from other sources of power generation in Great Britain.

Power from wind farms prevented the creation of almost 36 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions from sources such as coal and gas, in a six-year period - the equivalent of taking 2.3 million cars off the road, analysis of nationwide output shows.

Scientists present novel aspects of magnetic reconnection

Scientists present novel aspects of magnetic reconnection

In a recent magnetic reconnection research, scientists have shed light on explosive phenomena in astrophysics and fusion experiments.

Published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A, the study will help in better understanding the challenging process that occurs throughout the universe.

The study enables the scientists to unravel magnetic reconnection, a process that triggers explosive phenomena.

Researchers aim at developing better battery by peering into atom-sized tunnels

Researchers aim at developing better battery by peering into atom-sized tunnels

In a recent research, scientists have used a special electron microscope with atomic-level resolution to show that certain large ions can hold the tunnels open so that the charge-carrying ions can enter and exit the electrode easily and quickly.

Earlier battery researchers seeking improved electrode materials have focused on "tunneled" structures that made it easier for charge-carrying ions to move in and out of the electrode.

The findings are published in Nature Communications.

Scientists develop new algorithm to explain human face recognition

Scientists develop new algorithm to explain human face recognition

In a recent research published in Computational Biology, scientists have developed a new computational model of the human brain's face-recognition mechanism that seems to capture aspects of human neurology that previous models have missed.

The researchers designed a machine-learning system that implemented their model and they trained it to recognize particular faces by feeding it a battery of sample images.

2015-16 UK floods: Most extreme hydrological events of last century

2015-16 UK floods: Most extreme hydrological events of last century

A recent scientific review of the winter floods of 2015/2016 in UK confirms that the event was one of the most extreme and severe hydrological events of the last century.

The new hydrological appraisal - 'The Winter Floods of 2015/2016 in the UK', funded by Natural Environment Research Council, brought together both river flow and meteorological data in an analysis of the events that led to extensive river flooding in northern England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and parts of Wales over a three month period.

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Scientists find shape matters when light meets atom

Scientists find shape matters when light meets atom

Washington D.C [US], Dec. 4 : In a recent study published in the Natures Communications journal, researchers have shown that a photon's shape also affects how it is absorbed by a single atom.

Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what you're looking at.

Some photons reflect off, reaching your eyes, others get absorbed. The main decider of which happens is the photon's energy - its colour.

Can humans regenerate body parts like acorn worms?

Can humans regenerate body parts like acorn worms?

Is it possible for humans to regrow an amputated arm or leg, or completely restore nervous system function after a spinal cord injury?

It might be possible one day, as a new study of one of our closest invertebrate relatives, the acorn worm, reveals that acorn worms can regrow every major body part, raising hopes for regeneration in humans.

Acorn worms burrow in the sand around coral reefs, but their ancestral relationship to chordates means they have a genetic makeup and body plan surprisingly similar to ours.

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