Science

Indian scientists generate electricity from water sans using energy

Indian scientists generate electricity from water sans using energy

Soon, a device that runs on a few drops of water could revolutionise the way electricity is generated, thanks to a team of scientists at Delhi's National Physical Laboratory (NPL).

Researchers have developed a novel way of producing electricity from water at room temperature without using any power or chemicals. The device named, Hydroelectric Cell, generates electricity using nothing except a few drops of water.

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Despite prevalent usage, LEDs reduce profitability for manufacturers

Despite prevalent usage, LEDs reduce profitability for manufacturers

A recent survey conducted by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine reports that despite residential and commercial industries widely adopting energy-efficient light emitting diodes (LEDs), the drop in LED prices is driving away manufacturers because of decreased profitability, dramatically dislocating and restructuring the solid-state lighting marketplace.

Researchers discover planet-eating star, similar to Sun

Researchers discover planet-eating star, similar to Sun

In a recent research, a team of scientists from the University of Chicago has made the rare discovery of a planetary system with a host star similar to Earth's sun.

Published in the Astronomy and Astrophysics journal, what's most intriguing about the research is the star's unusual composition, which indicates it ingested some of its planets.

"It doesn't mean that the sun will 'eat' the Earth any time soon. But our discovery provides an indication that violent histories may be common for planetary systems, including our own," said Jacob Bean, co-author of the study.

NASA finds rainfall data on Tropical Cyclone Vardah

NASA finds rainfall data on Tropical Cyclone Vardah

NASA gathered rainfall data on Tropical Cyclone Vardah from its birth in the Bay of Bengal through its movement west into the Arabian Sea.

Rainfall totals were estimated over Vardah's lifetime and path, and NASA found heavy rainfall from the remnants on Dec. 14.

Although Vardah's circulation dissipated the remnants were still producing rainfall in a few stormy areas when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew over the Arabian Sea on Dec. 13 at 9:31 p.m. EST (Dec. 14 at 0231 UTC).

Groundwater resources around the world could be depleted by 2050s

Groundwater resources around the world could be depleted by 2050s

Human consumption could deplete groundwater in parts of India, southern Europe and the U.S. in the coming decades, according to new research presented at the 2016 AGU Fall Meeting.

New modeling of the world's groundwater levels finds aquifers -- the soil or porous rocks that hold groundwater -- in the Upper Ganges Basin area of India, southern Spain and Italy could be depleted between 2040 and 2060.

In the U.S., aquifers in California's Central Valley, Tulare Basin and southern San Joaquin Valley, could be depleted within the 2030s.

When in trouble, horses ask humans for help

When in trouble, horses ask humans for help

A Japanese researcher team has found when horses face problems that they cannot solve, they use visual and tactile signals -- touching and pushing -- to get human attention and ask for help.

The findings, published in journal of Animal Cognition, suggest that horses alter their communicative behavior based on humans' knowledge of the situation.

NASA's Curiosity rover detects boron on surface of Mars

In a first of its kind, NASA's Curiosity rover science team detected element Boron on the surface of Mars, indicating the potential for long-term habitable groundwater in the ancient past.

The finding provides more clues about water habitability.

The findings were discussed in San Francisco during the American Geophysical Union conference

"No prior mission to Mars has found boron," said a postdoctoral researcher Patrick Gasda from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Can water balloons bounce off from bed of nails?

Can water balloons bounce off from bed of nails?

A new study finds that water-filled balloons behave very similar to tiny water droplets, by bouncing them on a bed of nails.

Researchers from Roskilde University in the Denmark explained that water-filled balloons began to retract in the air rather than on the surface because some of the material penetrates into the nail pattern, recoils and -- if the impact velocity is high enough -- lifts the balloon off the bed of nails before it has time to retract.

The findings were published in the journal of Physics.

World's wet regions are getting wetter, dry regions are getting drier

World's wet regions are getting wetter, dry regions are getting drier

Research from the University of Southampton has provided robust evidence that wet regions of the earth are getting wetter and dry regions are getting drier but it is happening at a slower rate than previously thought.

The study, published in Scientific Reports, analysed the saltiness of the world's oceans.

More rain and outflow from rivers in a region of an ocean means sea water gets diluted and therefore becomes less salty. More evaporation in another region takes away fresh water and leaves salt behind making that region more saline.

Monkeys in Brazil unintentionally carve tools used by humans, 4300 years ago

Monkeys in Brazil unintentionally carve tools used by humans, 4300 years ago

A recent study found that the Bearded or Black-Striped Capuchin (Sapajus libidinosus), a species of wild monkey found in Brazil, makes sharp stone flakes by strongly and repeatedly hammering one rock against another embedded in an outcrop with a clear intent to smash it.

Monkeys observed performing this activity then lick and sniff the quartz dust resulting from the fragmentation of the rock.

This behavior by S. libidinosus frequently produces sharp-edged conchoidal flakes with smooth rounded facets resembling the shape of a scallop shell.

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