Science

'Princess Leia' brainwaves help store day memories: Study

'Princess Leia' brainwaves help store day memories: Study

While sleeping at night, electrical waves of brain activity circle around each side of your brain and are responsible for forming associations between different aspects of a day's memories, found The Salk Institute scientists.

The circular on the surface of your head might look like the twin hair buns of Star Wars' Princess Leia, says a study published in journal eLife.

Scientists discover details about dinosaur-era birds' feather

Scientists discover details about dinosaur-era birds' feather

If you are curious about the birds of dinosaur-era then there is good news as the scientists have recently discovered a new bohaiornithid bird specimen from the Early Cretaceous Period of China with remarkably preserved feathers.

Bohaiornithid birds belonged to enantiornithes, a group of avian dinosaurs that lived millions of years ago.

Our current knowledge of prehistoric plumage is limited, but the new findings provide valuable insights related to structure and colouration.

Pesticide exposure leads to changes in oral microbiome: Study

Pesticide exposure leads to changes in oral microbiome: Study

A recent study has found that pesticide exposure in farm workers from agricultural communities is linked with changes in the oral microbiome.

In the study, the investigators sampled oral swabs from 65 farm workers and 52 non-farm worker adults from the Yakima Valley (Washington) community agricultural cohort during the spring and summer (2005), when farm workers can undergo high pesticide exposures while working in recently sprayed orchards, thinning the fruit and pruning; and during winter (2006), when exposures are quite low.

Researchers develop world’s first semiconductor-free microelectronic device

Researchers develop world’s first semiconductor-free microelectronic device

UC San Diego researchers claimed to have developed the world’s first semiconductor-free microelectronic device that is 1,000 per cent more conductive with a much smaller band gap.

Semiconductors have played a key role in the development of new technologies, but the benefits of semiconductors come accompanied by certain constraints. For instance, semiconductors put up different levels of resistance constraining electron velocity. In addition, their large band gaps require opening bolts of energy to activate conductivity.

Male chimps spends time in grooming offspring: Study

Male chimps spends time in grooming offspring: Study

A recent study has found that male chimpanzees are more concerned about their own offspring than previously thought.

The research suggested that the male, associated with mothers of their offspring early in infancy and interacted with their infants more than expected.

The study comes on the backdrop of question that whether male chimpanzees could recognize their offspring.

Birds have built-in air conditioners, reveals CT Scan

Birds have built-in air conditioners, reveals CT Scan

In a recent study it has been found that birds' bills are filled with complex structures called nasal conchae that moderate the temperature of air being inhaled.

The same also helps in reclaiming water from air being exhaled and thus help them meet the demands of climate.

The researchers used CT scans to examine the conchae of two Song Sparrow subspecies, one that lives in warm, dry sand dunes and one that lives in moister habitats farther inland.

Babysitter helps female chimps to wean offspring faster

Babysitter helps female chimps to wean offspring faster

Looks like even chimps get benefitted by the babysitters.

A University of Toronto study says that it may even mean that mothers can wean their infants faster, which can allow them to reproduce again more quickly, with the help of babysitters.

The study looked at 42 pairs of chimpanzee mothers and infants at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda. They wanted to better understand the impact of "alloparenting" - or babysitting - when individuals other than the mother assisted with infant care.

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Bees recall past experiences before collecting pollen: Study

Bees recall past experiences before collecting pollen: Study

A recent study has found that bees make an overall sensory assessment of their experience at a particular flower before deciding, where to forage for pollen.

According to the University of Exeter study, they recall memory of previous experiences and use a variety of senses before collecting pollen.

The researchers believe pollen-collecting bees do not base their foraging decisions on taste alone, but instead make an "overall sensory assessment" of their experience at a particular flower.

Ross Sea agreement believes to be biggest deal ever hit to protect marine wildlife

Ross Sea agreement believes to be biggest deal ever hit to protect marine wildlife

The recent international agreement that aims to protect marine wildlife by creating the world’s largest marine reserve in Antarctica is believed to be the biggest deal ever hit to protect the region.

Nearly two dozen nations and the European Union (EU) agreed to establish the world’s largest marine protected area in Antarctica by preventing commercial fishing and other activities in the Ross Sea, which is home to marine creatures like whales, penguins and krill, which are currently threatened by overfishing.

Dealing with climate change is more important than merely adapting to it, says Norway ambassador

Dealing with climate change is more important than merely adapting to it, says Norway ambassador

Norway's Ambassador to India Nils Ragnar Kamsvag recently shared Norway's experience on dealing with climate change at the International Conference on Climate Change, Water, Agriculture and Food Security held in Hyderabad.

Climate change adaptation is important, but dealing with climate change is more important. We have to try to limit the climate change and take radical steps internationally, stated Ambassador Kamsvag in his opening remarks at the conference.

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