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Single drug dose can prevent early bone loss in HIV patients

Single drug dose can prevent early bone loss in HIV patients

A single dose of the drug zoledronic acid was found to inhibit bone loss that is common in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to results of a phase two clinical trial.

"We are encouraged that our protocol was able to prevent bone loss in HIV patients on ART therapy," said study co-author Igho Ofotokun, associate professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, US.

"These effects occurred early and last through 48 weeks, which is the period when ART-induced bone loss is most intense," Ofotokun noted.

Dodos `not` as dumb as we thought

Dodos `not` as dumb as we thought

Famous for their complete lack of a survival instinct, the now-extinct Dodos, whose name has entered popular culture as a symbol of stupidity, might have been quite intelligent, according to a new research.

The Stony Brook University work finds that the overall size of the dodo's brain in relation to its body size was on par with its closest living relatives: pigeons, birds whose ability to be trained implies a moderate level of intelligence.

Putting on happy face for kids can cost parents dearly

Putting on happy face for kids can cost parents dearly

It's always important to be a positive role model for your children and now, a new study has revealed the emotional cost for parents who put on a happy face.

The University of Toronto research suggests that parents' attempts to suppress negative and amplify positive emotions during child care can detract from their well-being and high-quality parent-child bonds.

Antarctic ice sheet responds higher to CO2

Antarctic ice sheet responds higher to CO2

Results from a new climate reconstruction of how Antarctica's ice sheets responded during the last period when atmospheric carbon dioxide reached levels like those expected to occur in about 30 years, suggest that the ice sheets are more vulnerable to rising atmospheric CO2 than previously thought.

Researchers led by Edward Gasson and Robert DeConto report results of a climate and ice sheet modeling study which is analysis of a 3,735-foot sediment core from McMurdo Sound to reconstruct the Antarctic ice sheets' history.

Booze in moderation good for heart, says study

Booze in moderation good for heart, says study

According to a new study, alcohol can do more good than harm for your heart when consumed in moderation.

Norwegian University of Science and Technology researchers have found that it is primarily the alcohol that leads to more good cholesterol, among other things. But alcohol can also cause higher blood pressure. So, it's best to drink moderate amounts relatively often.

Dapivirine ring can protect women against HIV

Dapivirine ring can protect women against HIV

A clinical trial involving more than 2,600 women in Africa finds that a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral (ARV) drug called dapivirine is safe for women and can help to protect them against HIV on a large scale.

The study found the dapivirine ring reduced the risk of HIV infection by 27 percent overall; there were 27 percent fewer women who acquired HIV in the group assigned to use the dapivirine ring than in the group assigned to use a placebo ring containing no active drug.

Sand Tiger sharks have complex social networks: Study

Sand Tiger sharks have complex social networks: Study

Sand Tiger sharks may have a more complex social structure than anyone would have thought, a recent study has reported.

Using tracking devices, American Geophysical Union researchers found that Sand Tiger sharks form complex social networks that are typically seen in mammals but rarely observed in fish.

Danielle Haulsee, a PhD candidate in oceanography at the University of Delaware in Lewes said, the higher-order decision-making processes are often associated with mammals, or species that we think of as really smart - dolphins, elephants, or chimpanzees.

People upset over graphic warning on cigarette packages

People upset over graphic warning on cigarette packages

If you think that the graphic warning labels of images of disease used on cigarette packages might stop its consumption then a new research has found that the good intentions of this tobacco control measure may be for naught.

According to a University of Illinois study, the reason behind this is that the graphic images are perceived by many as a threat to their freedom, choice or autonomy, and they respond accordingly.

Researcher Nicole LaVoie said they found that most people don't like these warning labels, whether they are smokers or non- smokers.

Alcohol in pregnancy may put kids at neurological problems risk

Alcohol in pregnancy may put kids at neurological problems risk

Mothers who consume alcohol during pregnancy put their children at the risk of impairment in kidney blood flow in adulthood and heightened neurological problems caused by a stroke, warns a study.

In the study conducted on mice, the blood flow analysis showed evidence for increased arterial resistance within the kidneys -- a sign of possible early onset renal hypertension in the male offspring that were exposed to alcohol before birth.

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