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Beware! Mild painkilling may not help patients with peripheral vascular disease

Beware! Mild painkilling may not help patients with peripheral vascular disease

Beware! That mild painkilling drug may not provide cardiovascular benefits for patients who have progressive circulation disorder caused by narrowing, blockage or spasms in a blood vessel.

According to researchers from University of Florida, aspirin therapy has been a staple of cardiology care for people who have peripheral vascular disease, which causes narrowed arteries and reduced blood flow to the limbs.

The findings were published today in the journal PLOS One.

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Stay fit! Too skinny or overweight both ups risk of migraine

Stay fit! Too skinny or overweight both ups risk of migraine

One has to stay fit for a healthy living as a study finds, both obesity and being underweight are associated with an increased risk for migraine.

Migraine is a headache of varying intensity, often accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to light and sound.

The findings indicate that obese people were 27 percent more likely to have migraine than people of normal weight.

People, who were underweight, were 13 percent more likely to have migraine than people of normal weight.

The study appeared in journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Acne vaccine comes closer to reality

Acne vaccine comes closer to reality

A cure for acne may have been found in the form of a vaccine, according to a team of scientists.

Acne is one of the most common skin conditions. According to the NHS around 80 percent of people aged 11 to 30 are affected by the disorder.

Lead researcher Eric C. Huange said, "Acne is caused, in part, by P. acnes bacteria that are with you your whole life and we couldn't create a vaccine for the bacteria because, in some ways, P. acnes are good for you," the Daily Star reported.

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An apple a day keeps diabetes away

An apple a day keeps diabetes away

You may want to add fresh fruits to your diet as according to a recent study, the greater the consumption, the lower is the incidence of diabetes, as well as occurrence of complications in diabetics.

Although the health benefits of diets including fresh fruit and vegetables are well established, the sugar content of fruit has led to uncertainty about associated risks of diabetes and of vascular complications of the disease.

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Soon, a treatment for aggressive brain cancer in kids

Soon, a treatment for aggressive brain cancer in kids

A team of researchers has discovered a promising target to treat atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour (AT/RT), a highly aggressive and therapy resistant brain tumour that mostly occurs in infants.

Using state-of-the-art gene editing technology, the scientists from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that these tumours' growth and tendency to metastasize are regulated by a protein kinase called Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), which is increased in AT/RT.

They also have demonstrated that an experimental drug, a PLK4 inhibitor, stopped tumour growth.

26 novel genes linked to intellectual disability

26 novel genes linked to intellectual disability

A team of researchers have identified 26 new genes linked to intellectual disability.

The study at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and Queen's University has implications for the diagnosis and clinical care of those affected, and also adds to our growing knowledge of brain development and functioning.

It may eventually lead to personalised treatments for affected individuals. Interestingly, some of the genes identified are thought to be connected with autism spectrum disorders.

Sewer workers could be at Ebola risk with current guidelines

Sewer workers could be at Ebola risk with current guidelines

Turns out, the guidelines from the U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization might not go far enough to protect sewer workers from Ebola virus.

Research from Drexel University and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that the sewer workers downstream of hospitals and treatment centres could contract Ebola via inhalation.

The study takes the first steps toward understanding the risk that this untreated waste poses to the people in the water treatment process who work in close proximity to it.

Toward more effective treatment for leukemia

Toward more effective treatment for leukemia

The discovery of a protein signature that is highly predictive of leukemia could make way for new and more effective therapeutics, according to a new study.

The University of Vermont study revealed that the activation of a protein known as STAT5 causes competition among other proteins that leads to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). If a drug could be developed to prevent the initial activation of STAT5 and restore the natural balance of proteins, ALL could potentially be treated more effectively.

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Role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort: Study

Role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort: Study

While it may be done for a good cause, a recent study reveals that disability simulations often result in feelings of fear, apprehension and pity toward those with disabilities.

Professionals in the fields of education and rehabilitation psychology have long used disability simulations to try to promote understanding and improve attitudes about persons with disabilities.

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